Permanent Parking

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Truck Deluxe has given up life on the road and set up shop in a new bricks-and-mortar premises in the Jaffa neighbourhood of Tel Aviv. The truck has been pulled apart and reconstructed as part of the kitchen with the added bonus of proper chairs and tables. In addition, the shopfront opens up street completely for a bit of extra atmosphere from the surrounding flea market. Studio OPA designed the space, imagining the venue as a backyard garage. Cans of motor oil adorn the walls, and industrial materials such as stainless steel and humble wood panelling are also in evidence. An injection of colour comes via a tile pattern arrangement running around the top of the dining area. This is a ceramic tribute inspired by the home of Truck Deluxe’s Southern USA barbecue style menu.

Words & pictures via WeHeartUK.

Cheaney’s Craft is Well Composed

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London’s Jermyn Street is known for many things, but most of all for being home to some of the finest tailors, shirtmakers and leather goods suppliers since the 17th century.

Cheaney’s shoes are a rare thing; wholly made in England from start to finish. It’s a traditional manufacturing industry of which there are very few left, and many of its team of 140 craftspeople have long held family connections with the business. But while so many heritage brands play on the old-world feel of craftsmanship and dusty Dickensian workshops, Cheaney enlisted contemporary design consultants Checkland & Kindleysides to take a more honest approach in their concept for the store.

The interior doesn’t romanticise the shoemaking process with fake nostalgia, instead it mimics the real-life factory of today. From the corian pegboard to the 1:100 scale model of the factory, the entire store is an exploded and layered display of how Cheaney & Sons make their shoes in a true-to-life, polished up, modern and contemporary setting. The design of the new store feels fresh and energising. It tells a fascinating story of how the shoes are made without being patronising. The intelligent (never gimmicky) use of materials and a lightness of touch in the design speaks to a more youthful, maverick clientele without alienating Cheaney’s traditional and longstanding customers.

When Cheaney approached the designers, they talked proudly about the company’s history. “But more than this, it was evident that the shoes and boots they make have a broad appeal across all age groups and tastes, appealing to people who love quality and craft but also individual expression and enduring style,” says Checkland Kindleysides co-founder Jeff Kindleysides.

“We felt we needed to create a store that departed from the perception of handmade English shoes being trapped in a place that was heritage, tradition and bygone, expressed in shops of dark wood and brown leather. We thought that for Cheaney to stand out in Jermyn Street our design should be light and be centred on the message of 'Made in England'. This for us is where the premium lies. This is why we built a store that says 'we still make our shoes in our factory in Northamptonshire'.”

The store is divided into two distinct areas. The front half – with its white painted brickwork, panelled ceiling and metal framed screens with reeded glass – echoes the factory itself. The rear is designed to feel like the boardroom area, with portraits of the founders Joseph Cheaney and his son Arthur removed from their gilded frames and hung in Perspex boxes, for a touch of Tate Modern cool.

This is where customers are served and fitted with their shoes, and the back wall provides additional displays of shoes and tools, leather sample finishes and details. Next to this, Joseph Cheaney’s most premium range of shoes is presented in a glazed cabinet behind locked sliding walnut-framed doors.

Describing the wall of old wooden shoe lasts right at the back of the store, Kindleysides says they wanted to celebrate this iconic symbol of the shoe maker's trade. “It immediately strips the story back to the starting point. From the outset we wanted to feature the lasts, each pair is an original from Cheaney's archive and each has a story to tell. They're all date stamped and they say a lot about the company's lineage as do the portraits of the company's founders.”

They say that to really know someone you have to walk a mile in their shoes. Checkland Kindelysides have done that for us with Joseph Cheaney & Sons, but their efforts are so successful they’ve created a store that makes you want to do the journey for yourself.

Words and pictures via The Telegraph, UK.  Author, Henrietta Thompson.

Article reference: telegraph.co.uk/luxury/design/43301/cheaney-sons-reinvent-tradition

Cheaney & Sons, 21b Jermyn Street, London, SW1Y 6HP  cheaney.co.uk

Best Foot Forward for this First Flagship

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The iconic British gumboot brand, Hunter, has unveiled an impressive new flagship store on London's Regent Street. I really want to jump on a plane and buy a new pair of Wellingtons after perusing these pictures and that red rubber shoulder bag is definitely going on my London Lust List!

Designed by Checkland & Kindleyside, they described the store as 'a journey designed to capture the senses and a spirit of adventure, it’s a playful and very Hunter take on the outdoors. It’s surreal, graphic and at times dreamlike, it’s a fantasy take on reality executed in a uniquely Hunter way. The innovative design takes iconic references from the British countryside and reappropriates them for the urban setting. The store creates a new take on rural architecture and the outdoors, redefined in the spirit of Hunter. Spanning three floors, the store provides the opportunity to create three distinct experiences for visitors; each one reflecting Hunter's pioneering spirit as a brand that 'takes the path that others dare not take'.  

From Hunter's Creative Director ..."The Regent Street flagship is the first opportunity for the Hunter customer to enter the home of this iconic British brand. This ambitious new store concept starts to clearly deliver a retail experience that represents the brand’s exciting new vision and future. It was important to establish our first retail presence on London’s Regent Street, one of the most iconic shopping streets in the world, staying true to our heritage as a British brand."  

Photos and words via checklandkindleysides.com

hunterboots.com  #hunterregentstreet

Hunter Fashion London
12/04/2015

Street/Seat Art

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Love this simple yet effective, bright yellow floral installation to signify winter is on the wane and spring has sprung in Germany.  Artist unknown. Via Colossal.

VM Germany
12/04/2015

An apple a day …

SONY DSCSONY DSCSONY DSC 7 Apples Gelato has always been good.  I thought their pop up cart, spied at Emporium, especially good. Lovely attention to detail in the branding and delivery and the dapper chappie's uniform is, of course, de rigueur.  I would love to know the name of the baby blue paint colour if anyone can help - its gorgeous!

Colour update: Thank you to the lovely Sara Brims from Novion who has reported in that the colour is Dulux Cornflower Blue.

Take a drive down Beach Road

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Earlier this week I was super impressed with the swish new look for the Sorrento to Queenscliff ferry. A few paces away from the water front and I discover there is a gorgeous new look Country Road store housed in the town's old post office, a rustic red-brick building built back in 1905. Celebrating it's 41st year, Country Road is the perfect positioning for the chi chi Sorrento set.  Naturally no lifestyle brand is complete without a cafe these days and Post 3943  taps into the coffee and casual dining trend. Operated by local organic specialists The Sisters, this 'resort / lifestyle' format will no doubt win huge favour with the locals for all its fabulousness!  Photos via Country Road Instagram.

Take The Lead

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Indooroopilly Shopping Centre (Brisbane) has just launched a new magazine featuring uber-stylish fashion for the upcoming Autumn Winter Racing season. POD's in centre VM channelled 'contemporary country' for the occasion, with elegant wooden 'corral inspired fencing' frames and vignettes of show pony silhouettes embellished with floral laurels.  Gold 'nose bags' of more fab flowers, brass buckles and leather leads completed the look. If you are off to the races, or just want to giddy up your wardrobe this winter, then I suggest you just might find the perfect frock at the new look Indooroopilly Shopping Centre.

POD peeps love creating a VM moment - thank you to our lovely client Natalie Kusrow for this opportunity. #leadthefield @indooroopillyshopping

Ship Shape

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Wow ... the Sorrento to Portsea ferry looked nothing like this last time I was on board.

Touted as an ‘experience of nautical discovery and refined coastal tourism’, the newly refurbished MV Sorrento ferry has been given a new lease of life thanks to designers Lucy Marczyk and Sonia Simpfendorfer of Nexus Designs.

Should you find yourself looking to cross Port Philip Bay in southern Victoria, either from the Mornington Peninsula or the Bellarine, then the passenger and vehicle carrying MV Sorrento ferry running between Sorrento and Queenscliff is arguably the most stylish way to now cross the bay.

Referencing the traditional maritime materials of plywood and roping through the use of custom built joinery in beige laminates, pale plywood accents and rope-coiled furnishings paired with custom designed striped Axminister carpets, the Nexus Designs team have created a nautical look that is in keeping with their signature style of classic, understated chic. A perfect way to travel the seas.

Words & Images via the very gorgeous EST Magazine. www.estmagazine.com.au  

Photos by James Geer.

www.nexusdesigns.com.au

     

Fresh from Rotterdam

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Wow, whether you love it or loath it there is no ignoring the new Markthal Rotterdam!

Designed by MVRDV, the Netherlands' first covered market shelters beneath a 40-metre arch that contains 228 apartments and is protected by glazed end walls which frame the super colourful mural by artists Arno Coenen and Iris Roskam.

Printed onto perforated aluminium panels, which line the one-hectare surface beneath the arch, the mural displays images of flowers and insects derived from 17th century Dutch paintings.

The UK's Guardian critic Oliver Wainwright has described it as "a Sistine chapel of fresh produce  ...  it squats like a chubby elephantine creature, lined with windows and balconies along its 120 metre-long flanks, terminating in a gaping portal towards the square like Milan's galleria, opening up to suck you into its psychedelic tunnel".

Speaking to Dezeen in Rotterdam just before construction was completed, architect Winy Maas explained that the building's unusual shape came about because he thought the initial scheme proposed by the developer was "boring". "In the beginning they wanted to have two slabs of houses, with a sort of market in between... so you get a U-shaped volume," he said. "I said "that's boring. Why don't we twist it?'" The new form provided more penthouses, a structurally simple arch and plenty of retail units on the ground floor, so the client gave the go-ahead.

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Internal windows in the apartments provide residents with views of the market below, while shoppers can glimpse the people above. "Every house has a window that look into the hall," said Maas. "When you're in the market hall you see urban life. When you go up where the windows are flat you can see people walking over the windows looking down."

Words and images above Via Dezeen.

No matter what your personal opinion might be, this architecture is no doubt a defining landmark in Rotterdam. There is definitely no ignoring the 'elephant' in the square or city for that matter. I love Oliver Wainwright's view on this 'hard to ignore' new structure which you can read here:

http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/architecture-design-blog/2014/oct/02/-sp-rotterdam-markthal-superdutch-market-mvrdv

Red’s B&W Greenhouse

POD Val Red 3POD Val Red 2POD Val Red_Florence Valentino Red's fashionable greenhouse popped up a couple of years back. I still like it so thought I'd share it! #popup #valentinored #florence